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Hairy Scot

When was PHOBIA downgraded to dislike?

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The PLPC keep rabbiting on about phobias or about someone being phobic about something.

Xenophobia, claustrophobia, acrophobia, arachnophobia, triskaidekaphobia, and paraskevidekatriaphobia all make sense since they are fears, however irrational.

I'm pretty sure that not many of us are afraid of gays or lesbians, so just what do homophobic and homophobia mean?

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Harold said:

phobia doesn't just mean fear Hairy....it also includes....aversion, dislike, hatred, repulsion.

As I said, those are what it has come to mean thanks to the PLPC.

A phobia is a fear.

Edited by Hairy Scot

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8 minutes ago, Hairy Scot said:

As I said, those are what it has come to mean thanks to the PLPC.

A phobia is a fear.

Have the plpc coerced whoever compiles dictionaries to change the meaning ? This is what I found...

phobia
/ˈfəʊbɪə/
noun
 
  1. an extreme or irrational fear of or aversion to something.
    "she suffered from a phobia about birds"
    synonyms: abnormal fear, irrational fear, obsessive fear, fear, dread, horror, terror, dislike, hatred, loathing, detestation, distaste, aversion, antipathy, revulsion, repulsion; More
     
     
     

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Posted (edited)

I agree Hairy,  always remember it meaning an irrational fear.... like buttons or beards etc

 

Now it makes up what Dug is saying.....

Basically, I have a phobia about onions!

 

Bit dramatic though.

Edited by Bastion

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2 hours ago, Harold said:

Have the plpc coerced whoever compiles dictionaries to change the meaning ? This is what I found...

phobia
/ˈfəʊbɪə/
noun
 
  1. an extreme or irrational fear of or aversion to something.
    "she suffered from a phobia about birds"
    synonyms: abnormal fear, irrational fear, obsessive fear, fear, dread, horror, terror, dislike, hatred, loathing, detestation, distaste, aversion, antipathy, revulsion, repulsion; More
     
     
     

Dictionaries tend to adopt current or common usage. However that does not change the fact that the original root and meaning of phobia is an irrational fear.

1 hour ago, Bastion said:

I agree Hairy,  always remember it meaning an irrational fear.... like buttons or beards etc

 

Now it makes up what Dug is saying.....

Basically, I have a phobia about onions!

 

Bit dramatic though.

Exactly. Phobia is a bit strong for mere dislike.

40 minutes ago, Roger said:

I have to admit that some lesbian's do frighten me. :)

Only the ons with beards.  :ugly-man-laugh-smiley-emoticon:

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47 minutes ago, Hairy Scot said:

Dictionaries tend to adopt current or common usage. However that does not change the fact that the original root and meaning of phobia is an irrational fear.

In addition to my previous post...

From the Cambridge

Meaning of phobia in English

phobia

noun [ C ]
 UK  /ˈfəʊ.bi.ə/ US  /ˈfoʊ.bi.ə/

an extreme fear or dislike of a particular thing or situation, especially one that cannot bereasonably explained:

From the Collins

 

phobia

(fbiə  )
 
Word forms: plural phobias 
countable noun
A phobia is a very strong irrational fear or hatred of something
 
also found....
When was the word phobia first used?
"irrational fear, horror, aversion," 1786,......Hmmmmmm, 1786 ?

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6 hours ago, Harold said:

In addition to my previous post...

From the Cambridge

Meaning of phobia in English

phobia

noun [ C ]
 UK  /ˈfəʊ.bi.ə/ US  /ˈfoʊ.bi.ə/

an extreme fear or dislike of a particular thing or situation, especially one that cannot bereasonably explained:

From the Collins

 

phobia

(fbiə  )
 
Word forms: plural phobias 
countable noun
A phobia is a very strong irrational fear or hatred of something
 
also found....
When was the word phobia first used?
"irrational fear, horror, aversion," 1786,......Hmmmmmm, 1786 ?

AH! So the answer to my question is 1786.    

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My point is that the impact of the suffices "phobia", "phobe", and "phobic" has been diluted by certain segments of society using them in creating labels for those who oppose or speak out against matters which those segments of society hold dear.

These suffices are meant to convey a much stronger meaning than "dislike" or "opposition to".

An excerpt from the OED:-

phobia, n.

Frequency (in current use): 

Origin: Formed within English, by conversion. Etymon: -phobia comb. form.

Etymology: < -phobia comb. form.

Thesaurus »

Categories »

 

  A fear, horror, strong dislike, or aversion; esp. an extreme or irrational fear or dread aroused by a particular object or circumstance.

1786   Columbian Mag. Nov. 110/1   I shall begin, by defining Phobia in the present instance, to be a fear of an imaginary evil, or an undue fear of a real one.

1801   S. T. Coleridge Let. 31 Oct. in J. Davy Fragmentary Remains Sir H. Davy (1858) 92   I..have a perfect phobia of inns and coffee-houses.

1887   Pall Mall Gaz. 17 Dec. 1/1   Confounding it with ‘Germanophobia’, ‘Francophobia’, or as many ‘phobias’ as you like!

1897   tr. T. A. Ribot Psychol. Emotions ii. ii. 215   We can easily see that many phobias come under this category.

1907   S. A. K. Wilson tr. H. Meige & E. Feindel Tics iv. 88   Prominent among the mental anomalies of the subjects of tic are found different sorts of phobia.

1954   R. F. C. Hull tr. C. G. Jung Devel. Personality in Coll. Wks. XVII. iv. 74   The latter [sc. the mother] projected all her phobias onto the child.

1994   Dog World Feb. 10/3   We may not know the root of a dog's phobia.

 

-phobia, comb. form

Origin: A borrowing from Latin. Etymon: Latin -phobia.

Etymology: < post-classical Latin -phobia (in e.g. hydrophobia hydrophobia n.) < Hellenistic Greek -ϕοβία (in e.g. ὑδροϕοβία ) < -ϕόβος (see -phobe comb. form) + -ία -ia suffix1.

First recorded in the Latin loan hydrophobia n.: this is probably the model for subsequent English formations. Formations within English are found from the 17th cent. (in an isolated example); a handful date from the 18th cent.; from the 19th cent. they are very abundant. Combined with a wide variety of first elements: these may be ultimately of Greek or Latin or English origin. Some pairs of synonyms occur with respectively Latin and Greek first elements, as aquaphobia n., feminophobia n., gynophobia n. at gyno- comb. form , and hydrophobia n. Several formations derive from the names of peoples, as Anglophobia n., Gallophobia n. at Gallo- comb. form1 2b, Germanophobia n., Russophobia n. Occasionally modern formations retaining the two elements separately, as school phobia n. at school n.1 Compounds 5a, should perhaps be regarded as compounds with phobia n. as the second element.

 

Compare French -phobie (formations in which are found from the early 19th cent.).

 

 

  Forming nouns with the sense ‘fear of ——’, ‘aversion to ——’.

1803   A. Seward Lett. (1811) VI. 94   He is a very laconic personage, and has upon him the penphobia.

1824   Life (1849) I. 125   She laboured under a perpetual dustophobia; and a comical disease it was.

1843   Blackwood's Edinb. Mag. 54 245   That powerful..writer..depicts the same regiphobia as raging among the Parisian Charlatanerie.

1896   Westm. Gaz. 6 June 2/2   The cycling craze has produced the antagonistic disease of cyclophobia.

1902   Westm. Gaz. 21 Oct. 2/3   There were symptoms in the City attitude of a certain amount of L.C.C.-phobia [= dread of the London County Council].

1928   A. Huxley Let. 9 Nov. (1969) 304   When my epistolophobia becomes..acute I will apply to you for..aid.

1978   N.Y. Mag. 3 Apr. 85/2 (advt.)    Swim-o-phobia? Cure it forever. Our private lessons by professional instructors will have you phobia-free and swimming in no time.

1997   Independent 25 Mar. 119/4   It was immediately obvious that screening isn't very accurate, that an abnormal smear is rarely anything to worry about but we've sown the seeds of Big C-phobia anyway.

 

 

 

homophobia, n.1

View as:

Keywords:

Quotations:

Pronunciation: 

Brit. /ˌhɒməˈfəʊbɪə/

/ˌhəʊməˈfəʊbɪə/

U.S. /ˌhoʊməˈfoʊbiə/

Frequency (in current use): 

Origin: A borrowing from Latin, combined with an English element. Etymons: Latin homō  , -phobia comb. form.

Etymology: Irregularly < classical Latin homō human being, person (see homo n.1) + -phobia comb. form.

 

Compare earlier anthropophobia n.(Show Less)

rare.

Thesaurus »

Categories »

 

  Fear or hatred of men or the male sex. Later also: fear of human beings or humankind; anthropophobia.

1901   Des Moines (Iowa) Daily News 4 June 4/7   Young women of America have homophobia, you know, just as children have measles.

1920   Chambers's Jrnl. 5 June 418/1   Her salient characteristic was a contempt for the male sex as represented in the human biped... The seeds of homophobia had been sown early.

1960   T. Kora in A. Koestler Lotus & Robot ii. 213   Of nervosity symptoms, homophobia appears most frequently. In this is included fear of blushing when appearing before a person, or erythrophobia.

 

homophobia, n.2

View as:

Keywords:

Quotations:

Pronunciation: 

Brit. /ˌhɒməˈfəʊbɪə/

/ˌhəʊməˈfəʊbɪə/

U.S. /ˌhoʊməˈfoʊbiə/

Frequency (in current use): 

Origin: Formed within English, by compounding. Etymons: homosexual adj., -phobia comb. form.

Etymology: < homo- (in homosexual adj.) + -phobia comb. form, perhaps influenced by homophobia n.1(Show Less)

Categories »

 

 1. Fear (in a heterosexual man) of being thought to be homosexual. rare.Apparently an isolated use, now entirely superseded by sense 2.

1969   Screw 23 May 20/1   What a pitiful state of affairs has been brought about by homophobia! (Homophobia is an intense and neurotic fear of being thought attracted to one's own sex.)

(Hide quotations)

 

Thesaurus »

 

 2. Hostility towards, prejudice against, or (less commonly) fear of homosexual people or homosexuality.

1969   Time 31 Oct. 61/3   Such homophobia..involves innumerable misconceptions and oversimplifications.

1975   Globe & Mail (Toronto) 4 Sept. 7/3   There is no such thing as the homosexual problem any more than there is a black problem—the problems are racism and homophobia.

1992   When Sat. Comes Apr. 10/1   Apart from the odd nudge-nudge, there was a happy absence of homophobia.

2017   Derbyshire Times (Nexis) 14 Feb.   For there to be no homophobia in football it has been highlighted that match officials must document and report any abuse.

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